Guinea Pigs

Guinea Pigs eating

Guinea pigs are the ideal family pocket pet! They are very social critters so best kept with at least one other guinea pig. 

We encourage vet checks every six months as well as microchipping. Vaccination of guinea pigs is not recommended. 

Please contact us to further discuss the individual requirements of your guinea pig. 

Feeding

It’s important to give your pet a good start in life so that he/she starts out healthy and stays that way. Guinea pig care begins with proper food, and these pets eat hay, forage grasses, and pellets. They have a high fibre requirement and therefore need plenty of access to high quality hay. Pre-prepared mixed foods should be avoided as they can lead to serious nutritional problems. The remainder of the diet needs to consist of pellets, green vegetables and herbs. 

How many should I get?

As much as your guinea pig is going to bond with you, he’ll be even happier if he has a companion. He’ll do well with a male buddy as long as there’s no female around. You can also put a baby in with an adult, as long as both of them are the same sex. Keep an eye on them for a couple hours to be certain they don’t fight.

guinea pigs

Grooming

Guinea pigs groom themselves, and sometimes they groom each other. You can join in with a brush. This helps to remove loose hair on a daily basis. And if you like, you can bathe them occasionally in shallow water using kitten shampoo.

Housing

Guinea pigs need to be housed in a large well ventilated area with frequent bedding changes. It is recommended that they be brought inside on hot and cold days as they do not thermoregulate well. Shredded paper or straw provide the ideal nest for your guinea pigs. Keep water fresh by providing multiple dripper bottles. 

Black Guinea Pig

Nails

One of the reasons for the calcium is that guinea pigs have open-rooted teeth, which means they never stop growing. The nails also need to be trimmed about every four to six weeks. In fact, some experts recommend using a regular human nail trimmer to cut just a little every week; this causes the vein that runs in his nails-the “quick”-to recede a little. If you don’t trim his nails, they’ll develop a retro-curl that digs painfully into their pads.

Common Mistakes

Good guinea pig care includes learning about some common mistakes made by well-meaning owners. For example, they do not do well with giant wheels and exercise balls. These can cause injury. The drinking water you provide daily should not be the medium for their vitamin drops, leave the water clear. Many guinea pigs hate the taste of the vitamins, so they’ll avoid their water and become dehydrated.